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Mademoiselle Pogany II

Constantin Brancusi (Romanian, 1876–1957). Mademoiselle Pogany II, 1920. Bronze, 24 1/4 x 8 1/2 x 10 inches (61.6 x 21.6 x 25.4 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Charlotte A. Watson Fund, 1927. © Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Constantin Brancusi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Constantin Brancusi

Romanian, active in France, 1876-1957

Mademoiselle Pogany II, 1920

bronze

base: 7 x 8 1/2 x 9 inches (17.78 x 21.59 x 22.86 cm); sculpture: 17 1/4 x 7 x 10 inches (43.81 x 17.78 x 25.4 cm); overall: 24 1/4 x 8 1/2 x 10 inches (61.59 x 21.59 x 25.4 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Charlotte A. Watson Fund, 1927

1927:22

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

foundry mark / C.Valsuani/Cire Perdue
signature, undated / lower left / C. Brancusi

Provenance

the artist;
sold to John Quinn, November 1920.
collection of Marcel Duchamp, Paris;
sold through the Société Anonyme, New York, to the Albright Art Gallery, March 20, 1927

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Cast (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Constantin Brancusi’s gracefully restrained forms are recognized as one of the major sculptural developments of the early twentieth century. In 1910, Brancusi met this sculpture’s subject, the landscape painter Margit Pogány (Hungarian, 1879–1964), in Paris. After visiting his studio, she requested he make her portrait and sat for him several times. In two letters to The Museum of Modern Art dated 1952 and 1953, Pogány recounted how the portrait came to be. “Once I had to sit for my hands but the pose was quite different to that of the present bust, he only wanted to learn them by heart as he already knew my head by heart.” It was not until after Pogány returned to Hungary in early 1911, however, that Brancusi carved her likeness in marble from memory. A bronze cast was then made from the marble original. Seven years later, Brancusi created a second version of her portrait, both in marble and, as seen here, in bronze. The mannerist forms of "Mademoiselle Pogany II" are at once a statement of the inherent beauty of Brancusi’s medium and a representation of female beauty. Not unlike a caricaturist, Brancusi has simplified, and therefore emphasized, his subject’s features: large, almond-shaped eyes; severe brows; a slender nose; an ornate chignon of hair; and the demure gesture of hands resting against a chin.
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