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Dinamismo di un cane al guinzaglio (Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash)

Giacomo Balla (Italian, 1871–1958). Dinamismo di un cane al guinzaglio (Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash), 1912. Oil on canvas, 35 3/8 x 43 1/4 inches (89.9 x 109.9 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Bequest of A. Conger Goodyear and Gift of George F. Goodyear, 1964 (1964:16). © Estate of Giacomo Balla / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome.

© Estate of Giacomo Balla / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome

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© Estate of Giacomo Balla / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Giacomo Balla

Italian, 1871-1958

Dinamismo di un cane al guinzaglio (Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash), 1912

oil on canvas

support: 35 3/8 x 43 1/4 inches (89.8525 x 109.855 cm); framed: 37 3/4 x 45 5/8 x 2 3/4 inches (95.88 x 115.89 x 6.99 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of A. Conger Goodyear and Gift of George F. Goodyear, 1964

1964:16

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / lower right / Balla 1912
inscription / reverse, on cardboard backing / PITTOR BALLA / VIA OSLAVIA 39 ROMA / TITOLO CANE AL GUINZAGLIO
inscription / reverse of original canvas, before relining / CANE AL GUINZAGLIO / FUTUR BALLA / VIA OSLAVIA 39 / ROMA

Provenance

Sturm-Galerie;
purchased from the artist by A. Conger Goodyear, 1938;
bequeathed jointly to his son, George F. Goodyear, life interest, and Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 1964;
gift of George F. Goodyear's life interest to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, December 1984

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Oil painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In 1910, Giacomo Balla and four fellow Italian artists—Umberto Boccioni (1882–1916), Carlo Carrà (1881–1966), Luigi Russolo (1885–1947), and Gino Severini (1883–1966)—wrote La Pittura futurista: Manifesto tecnico (The Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painters). In this document they rejected all previous art as prosaic. A key tenet of their philosophy was that creative expression should represent the dynamism of the early 20th century’s fast-paced Industrial Age. They declared, “All things move, all things run, all things are rapidly changing. . . . moving objects constantly multiply themselves . . . a running horse has not four legs, but twenty.” This sentiment is reflected in both the title and the composition of Dinamismo di un cane al guinzaglio (Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash). 

Balla painted this amusing study of a skittering dachshund and the staccato steps of his or her owner in May 1912 while visiting one of his students, the Contessa Nerazzini, at Montepulciano, near Siena. The lively background, with its vibrating and contrasting streaks of pink and green, is said to represent the white dust of the Tuscan countryside shimmering under the bright summer sun. The feet of the woman, the leash, and the dog’s body from nose to tail are all blurred and repeated. To enhance the impression of speed, Balla painted the ground using diagonal lines and placed his signature and the date at a dynamic angle. This rhythmic gesture also extends to the frame, which both contains and continues the composition.

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