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Untitled

Donald Judd (American, 1928-1994). Untitled, 1969. Galvanized iron and Plexiglas, each unit: 6 x 27 1/8 x 24 inches (15.3 x 69 x 61 cm); overall (ten units): 120 x 27 1/8 x 24 inches (304.8 x 68.9 x 61 cm); Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Edmund Hayes Fund, 1972 (1972:4). © Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

© Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Donald Judd

American, 1928-1994

Untitled, 1969

galvanized iron and Plexiglas

each unit: 6 x 27 1/8 x 24 inches (15.24 x 68.9 x 60.96 cm); overall (ten units): 120 x 27 1/8 x 24 inches (304.8 x 68.9 x 60.96 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Edmund Hayes Fund, 1972

1972:4

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

Galerie Ileana Sonnabend, Paris;
by 1972, to Leo Castelli Gallery, New York;
May 1, 1972, purchased from Leo Castelli Gallery by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Construction (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Donald Judd was an influential leader of Minimalism, an art movement that favored industrial materials and anonymity over the expressiveness of Abstract Expressionism. Best known for his ability to harness bold color, repetition, and simple geometric shapes, Judd began working with an industrial fabricator in 1964 to create objects according to his exact specifications that are based on the neutrality of the box form. He explained, "I don't like sculpture with a handled look, just as I don't like the evidence of brushwork in painting. All of that implies expressionism, implies that the artist is involved with the work as he goes along. . . . I want the material to be material when you look at it.”

In the work presented here, ten identical boxes in a vertical composition appear to float off the wall; the units are separated by intervals that are precisely equal to the height of an individual element. The appearance of weightlessness is heightened by the artist’s use of translucent orange Plexiglas as the top and bottom of the boxes. When lit, the installation creates a dramatic interplay of color and shadows.

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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