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A*

Tabor Robak (American, born 1986). A*, 2014. Fourteen-channel HD video with real-time 3D, edition AP 1 of an edition of 3 and 2 APs; running time: 9 minutes, 46 seconds. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Sherman S. Jewett Fund, by exchange, 2015 (2015:7.1a-n). © 2014 Tabor Robak. 

© Tabor Robak

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tabor Robak

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tabor Robak

American, born 1986

A*, 2014

fourteen-channel HD video

Edition: artist's proof 1/2 from an edition of 3

running time: 9 minutes, 46 seconds

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Sherman S. Jewett Fund, by exchange and George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2015

2015:7.1a-n

More Details

Provenance

the artist;
Team Gallery, New York;
April 16, 2015, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

New media art

Work Type

Digital art (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

A* is a grandiose altarpiece for the digital world, with our latest technology’s fabricated deities and icons replacing traditional religious imagery. Painstakingly animated landscapes immerse the viewer in a fourteen-channel, looped macrocosm of popping balls, dropping jewels, googly-eyed aliens, barnyard animals, and menacing monsters. In some sections, artist Tabor Robak combined his fourteen monitors into a single virtual canvas, while other sections feature a collage of imagery parsed out to discrete screens. Strange because of its content and complexity, yet familiar from the countless hours we have spent glued to our sparkling screens, A* brings to life the vast capacities of contemporary technology while calling into question our willing transfixion.

Working in programs such as Adobe After Effects, Unity, and Cinema 4D, Robak renders his imagery in what he refers to as a “desktop screensaver aesthetic.” Citing inspiration from early Cyan games, software tutorials, and Alienware (custom gaming computers), Robak creates dazzling multiscreen installations that reflect upon the relationship between humanity and technology.

Label from Screen Play: Life in an Animated World, June 20–September 13, 2015

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