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Fields of Grain as Seen from Train

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Arthur Garfield Dove

American, 1880-1946

Fields of Grain as Seen from Train, 1931

oil on canvas

support: 24 x 34 1/8 inches (60.96 x 86.68 cm); framed: 33 1/8 x 43 1/8 x 4 1/4 inches (84.14 x 109.54 x 10.8 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1958

K1958:1

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

signature / lower left / Dove

Provenance

the artist;
estate of the artist, after Arthur Garfield Dove's death in 1946;
to the Downtown Gallery, New York, by 1956;
sold to the Albright Art Gallery, March 11, 1958

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Oil painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Arthur Dove developed a pictorial language in which simplified, semi-abstract forms and earthen colors express the essence of the pastoral American landscape. Early in his career, Dove supported himself by farming, and Fields of Grain as Seen from Train celebrates the redeeming power of fertile lands. He felt that the most important characteristic of nature was its integrity, so his paintings have generalized elements and few colors. Here, waves of grain blowing in the wind and the furrows in a newly plowed field are extracted from nature and become symbols. These forms are visually unified, as if you were viewing the scene from the window of a passing train. The light is that of a warm late summer afternoon. In its rounded heaviness, the central funneling shape alludes to organic ripeness, as do the other swelling forms in a restricted but warm palette of earthy browns, yellow and verdant greens, and burnt orange. While the colors of nature predominate, they are not used realistically. Like his imagery, they are abstracted.

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