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Vega-Nor

Victor Vasarely (French, born Hungary, 1906–1997). Vega-Nor, 1969. Oil on canvas, 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 inches (200 x 200 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1969 (K1969:29). © Foundation Vasarely / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

© Fondation Vasarely / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Fondation Vasarely / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Fondation Vasarely / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Victor Vasarely

French, born Hungary, 1906-1997

Vega-Nor, 1969

oil on canvas

support: 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 inches (200.03 x 200.03 cm); framed: 80 x 80 1/2 x 3 inches (203.2 x 204.47 x 7.62 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1969

K1969:29

Collection Highlight

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

Sidney Janis Gallery, New York;
sold to Seymour H. Knox, Jr. for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, December 4, 1969

Class

Paintings

Work Type

Oil painting

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Op art refers to the work of a group of artists who emerged in the 1960s were interested in the scientific properties of color and line, and the ways in which the human eye processes information. Victor Vasarely was at the core of the movement, earning him the nickname “Father of Op Art.” Vega-Nor is one of a number of paintings the artist created in which an orderly grid seemingly swells and protrudes off the picture plane. Warm colors, like orange and yellow, typically appear to advance in space, which is why Vasarely chose these hues for the area surrounding the central squares. The cells become progressively thinner and smaller toward the edges of the canvas, as if they are receding into space. This work takes its title from Vega, one of the brightest stars in the night sky, and Vasarely explained, “this composition expresses the extension, the expansion of the Universe: the extreme of the great infinities of Nature.”

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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