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Ocean Park No. 66

© Estate of Richard Diebenkorn

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Richard Diebenkorn

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Richard Diebenkorn

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Richard Diebenkorn

American, 1922-1993

Ocean Park No. 66, 1973

oil on canvas

support: 93 x 81 inches (236.22 x 205.74 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1974

K1974:6

Collection Highlight

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / front, lower left / RD 73
inscription / back, upper right / R. DIEBENKORN / OCEAN PARK #66 / 1973

Provenance

the artist;
Marlborough Gallery, Inc.;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery with funds provided by Seymour H. Knox, Jr., September 1, 1974

Class

Paintings

Work Type

Oil painting

Information may change due to ongoing research.Glossary of Terms

This year marks the 100th birthday of American artist Richard Diebenkorn (1922–1993). In celebration of this centennial, we are spotlighting his critical “Ocean Park” series. In 1955, Diebenkorn ceased exploring abstraction, only to pick it up again eleven years later in 1967 after working in a more representational mode. This course change was prompted, in part, by the artist’s move from northern to southern California. Titled after a beachfront section in Santa Monica where he lived, the “Ocean Park” paintings encompass the hazy light and languid colors of Diebenkorn’s new surroundings. Yet it would be a mistake to interpret a work like Ocean Park No. 66 as only an abstract landscape. Rather, the composition responds to formal and aesthetic concerns and his receptiveness to the environment. In a 1983 letter to the Albright-Knox about recommencing the series, the artist wrote, “My concerns, as before, are with simply making painting yet the as always is the subject for landscape interpretation. This has ceased to bother me.”

– Godin-Spaulding Senior Curator for the Collection Holly E. Hughes, April 2022

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