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Sculpture classique (Classical Sculpture)

© Estate of Jean Arp / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Jean Arp / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Jean (Hans) Arp

French, born Germany, 1886-1966

Sculpture classique (Classical Sculpture), 1964

marble

overall: 96 x 14 x 16 inches (243.84 x 35.56 x 40.64 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

A. Conger Goodyear Fund, 1965

1965:3

Collection Highlight

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

the artist;
purchased via the Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, February 8, 1965

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Sculpture (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In 1908, Jean (Hans) Arp moved to Paris to study art, but he quickly came to disapprove of formal academia. Therefore, in 1909, he moved to the small town of Weggis, Switzerland, where he worked for several years in isolation. Two years later Arp visited the artist Vassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866–1944) in Munich. There he encountered the artists of the avant-garde group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider). Soon after, Arp began contributing to the group’s publications and exhibitions. It was around this same time that he began experimenting with free-form imagery, which became a vital compositional component of his work.

During the 1950s, Arp made two trips to Greece, which led to his renewed interest in the classical human form. In Classical Sculpture, the standing female body is reduced to gentle curves that visually articulate recognizable parts of a figure, including shoulders, a bust line, and hips. However, unlike his earlier sculptural works that often incorporate a base of contrasting materials, such as Somersault, 1942, the elegant form of Classical Sculpture melds seamlessly with the base to create a singular structural outline.

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